Is My Case Suitable for Mediation?

Lawyer with individuals settling a dispute

Mediation is the process of settling a dispute informally and privately without the need for a legal judgment from a jury or judge. Those involved in the negotiation simply meet with a mediator, which is a neutral third party, to come to an agreement that would mutually benefit all parties and end the conflict.

It is crucial to note that individuals will not be forced to come to a solution, instead, the mediator helps both sides communicate more effectively to try to come to some mutual agreement.

What Cases Can Undergo Mediation?

Unfortunately, not all cases can go through mediation. Those that could are typically noncriminal cases such as those that involve divorce, ownership of small businesses, leases, employment, and contracts.

For instance, estranged business owners might opt for mediation to come to a mutually beneficial agreement to divide their assets or divorcing couples might choose mediation to come up with a mutually beneficial child custody arrangement.

Mediation finds use in some nonviolent criminal cases like personal harassment claims, adds an experienced lawyer that also offers a service for mediation and arbitration.

How About Those without Legal Options?

Likewise, while there are countless laws pertaining to different cases, many kinds of common disputes are not enough to support legal claims that require court intervention such as family, employee, or neighbor disputes.

To illustrate, you might want to deal with a neighbor’s excessively bright exterior lights that are keeping you up at night but don’t have a definite legal option available to you, aside from mediation. Mediation offers the chance to discuss issues in a civilized manner.

For instance, your neighbor might have intentionally installed excessively bright exterior lights to ward off your pet that has been dirtying his lawn because he or she did not know how to broach the subject to you.

The Bottom Line

Mediation could be the answer you are looking for if you are stuck in a dispute that cannot be resolved through court orders, or if you simply want to avoid the lengthy and often costly process of litigation.